There’s no denying that it’s fall. It’s crisp in the mornings, orange and yellow leaves are appearing, and kids have already been back to school for four weeks. It’s a season of change: we’re putting our summer clothes into storage and getting out our boots; the slow season at work is over and our schedules are packed with new activities; and the local strawberries and peaches at the grocery store have been replaced with local apples, beets, and carrots.

One of the best lessons from mindfulness training is that our minds have a mind of their own. We can’t necessarily control the automatic thoughts that pop into our minds, any more that we can control the automatic emotions that arise in response. So what, then, should we do when our mind gets stuck in a cycle of rumination?

The MindSpace blog is pleased to introduce a new series: The Science of Mindfulness. Starting this summer, we’ll be periodically posting reviews of some of the most compelling scientific research on mindfulness. We believe our readers will be as fascinated as we are by the amazing work being conducted at this new frontier of neuroscience.